I/O 2016: what is Google good at?

Attending my first ever Google I/O event and listening to the keynote live, I wanted to hear all about the exciting products Google plans to introduce this year. Yet instead of revolutionary new products, many of the presenters talked about smaller, evolutionary features. It wasn’t disappointing, per se, but it wasn’t thrilling, either. The only … Continue reading I/O 2016: what is Google good at?

Google’s new project Sunroof : making solar feasibility calculations easier

Amidst the hype around the new Android release name (Marshmallow!) Google quietly announced Project Sunroof: a site that will tell users how much usable sunlight, i.e. strong enough and at the right angle to efficiently be converted into energy, their rooftop gets in a year. It also provides a cost analysis for solar installation based … Continue reading Google’s new project Sunroof : making solar feasibility calculations easier

The continuing saga of Google and the right to be forgotten

Two interesting developments in the “right to be forgotten” space, which conversely serve to show how ridiculous the demands from Google (and, to be fair, other search engines but none come close to Google’s search market share in Europe and the US) are and how necessary they could be. The debate also serves to strengthen … Continue reading The continuing saga of Google and the right to be forgotten

Helping the next billion come online – my favorite part of I/O

Yesterday I watched the Google I/O keynote and was impressed many times over by the new features and products announced by Google and Android. Yet, as impressed as I was/am by Photos, Cardboard, and Google Now (and I might just write a post about each next week after I have had some time to play … Continue reading Helping the next billion come online – my favorite part of I/O

Are Google’s new health results a good thing?

Google announced today that it would be adding comprehensive health information from reliable sources to its “Knowledge Graph.” That’s the set of search results that usually appear in a box to the left of the search results, as a card before the first result, or as an image carousel on top. The ones I’ve seen … Continue reading Are Google’s new health results a good thing?

Recipe resources: why they suck and what can make them better

There are areas of the web, dark, dark areas, where misinformation is rampant and ratings count for nothing. Where you can look for help and find disaster. Where you can hope to make an impression on a loved one, and end up breaking up before the evening is over. Where SEO rules more than taste. … Continue reading Recipe resources: why they suck and what can make them better

Groupon and the “let’s spin it out” app trend

Groupon announced yesterday that it was launching a new app, Getaways, which will focus on travel offers. This follows Facebook’s spin off of its messaging functionality into a separate app that Zuckerberg discussed last week. Folks, it seems like we have ourselves a trend! Groupon gave an interesting explanation as to why it decided to … Continue reading Groupon and the “let’s spin it out” app trend

Looking for jobs in all the wrong places: an idea for LinkedIn

Yesterday as I was researching stats for my LinkedIn post I came across numerous articles about how recruiters search, find and look at profiles. Every article gave similar advice: have a profile photo, make sure your title is fabulous, and update your location. After that, pepper your experience and summary with the right keywords to … Continue reading Looking for jobs in all the wrong places: an idea for LinkedIn

Mobile Search and the Importance of Now

Let me tell you something you already know: there’s a difference between mobile searches and desktop searches. Even though the apps are identical and the search terms may be the same, users are not looking for the same result. One example is maps. On a desktop, searching for a location on a map is like … Continue reading Mobile Search and the Importance of Now

The Right To Be Forgotten, Part 2 of Many

Paul Ford at Businessweek wrote a very compelling post to make the case for “Erase My History” by Google and the other search engines and about his experience at digitizing the Harper Magazine archive. He made two important points: First, not everyone knows how to create new and more relevant content that will push older, perhaps … Continue reading The Right To Be Forgotten, Part 2 of Many