Can tech be better? What can we do as PMs to be more critical and ask more questions.

A vacation away from Twitter and Silicon Valley usually serves as healthy step back and usually allows me to take a higher level look at how tech is perceived by outsiders. The unpleasant truth is that tech is no longer the shining light it once was (once being a scant few months ago) and people … Continue reading Can tech be better? What can we do as PMs to be more critical and ask more questions.

YouTube Kids and the corruption of recommendation algorithms

Recommendation engines have been around for years, at least since Amazon started correlating shared purchases and suggesting products (or was it only books back then?) with “since you bought this, you might like this.” It was a good-enough recommendation algorithm that helped shoppers sift through endless options to find what was relevant for them. The … Continue reading YouTube Kids and the corruption of recommendation algorithms

Tech, climate change, big data, and making a difference

A while ago I wrote about the challenges of writing a tech blog about apps and gadgets when world-altering events are going on. This came into focus this week after the president’s withdrawal from the Paris Accord and the ensuing conversation. Then, surprisingly, commitment to support the Accord poured in from cities, states, universities and … Continue reading Tech, climate change, big data, and making a difference

Writing a tech blog in days of political uncertainty

No matter what your political beliefs, if you're an American, the last two weeks since the inauguration have been, well, interesting. In fact, there is such a stream of breaking, urgent news that there doesn’t seem to be any calm downtime any more. As someone who usually writes about mobile and web consumer products, it’s … Continue reading Writing a tech blog in days of political uncertainty

Sharing is caring: we’re missing something in the all-digital age of media

Last week the New York Times published a nostalgic piece about the state of media consumption. Teddy Wayne, the author of the article, discussed how isolated our reading and listening experiences are now, and how we have abandoned many practices that used to allow people to expand their musical and literary horizons. We read news, … Continue reading Sharing is caring: we’re missing something in the all-digital age of media

Theoretical thoughts on Uber

When I was in college, way before Uber, way before the “sharing economy,” I was lucky enough to have a car. As my college was about an hour and a half away from home, I’d drive home almost every weekend, and drive back every Monday morning. For those rides back, three other students would join … Continue reading Theoretical thoughts on Uber

The distance between hype and adoption, 2015 edition

Update: the 2016 edition is here!  It’s the end of summer and Gartner has released it’s annual Hype Cycle chart, where products climb up from the Trigger of Innovation to Peak of Inflated Expectations, also known as Hype, down the slippery slope to the Trough of Disillusionment and slowly up to the Plateau of Productivity, … Continue reading The distance between hype and adoption, 2015 edition

Helping Nepal from afar: appreciating the work done by Google, Twitter & Apple

When I heard about Nepal’s earthquake late Friday night I had a feeling it was going to bad. Not only was the quake estimated at over 7.5 on the Richter scale right at the beginning (it ended up being classified as 7.8!) but Nepali buildings were not built to withstand such tremors. News over the … Continue reading Helping Nepal from afar: appreciating the work done by Google, Twitter & Apple

When assumptions about a user can go too far

A few years ago, Target made headlines by announcing a pregnancy to a teen’s father. In this recap of the incident from over three years ago, Target statistician Andrew Pole claimed “he was able to identify about 25 products that, when analyzed together, allowed him to assign each shopper a “pregnancy prediction” score. More important, … Continue reading When assumptions about a user can go too far

A few thoughts about the tech echo chamber we live in

Vacation is a time to get away from it all and “it” includes the tech scene. I spent last week without Twitter or Facebook and only glanced at urgent emails. I also had the time to sit down for long chats with old friends who don’t work in tech and live far, far away from … Continue reading A few thoughts about the tech echo chamber we live in