The Gartner hype cycle: a personal take

It’s time for my annual look at Gartner’s hype cycle, where I pick out the technology trends that interested me and how they’ve played out in Silicon Valley and outside it. I love looking at this analysis first and foremost because it adds perspective to the often subjective opinion of leading edge tech that we … Continue reading The Gartner hype cycle: a personal take

Google Maps is creepy. It’s time to think differently about user data collection and use

We’re in a period of heightened user privacy concerns, amidst users' growing understanding of the breadth and depth of the personal data collected about them. One would think, as a product manager, that this might be a time for being more respectful of user privacy and to be less blatant about how much sensitive data … Continue reading Google Maps is creepy. It’s time to think differently about user data collection and use

The language of privacy – will it change?

Today I stumbled across a British privacy report that re-wrote Instagram’s Privacy Policy for teens in non-legalese English. While not commonly a product issue, Terms of Service and Privacy Statements can have an impact on users, especially when they run afoul of them. Jenny Afia, the lawyer who rewrote the terms, believes everyone, but especially … Continue reading The language of privacy – will it change?

Thoughts about data silos and on Microsoft buying LinkedIn

“Don't Post Anything You Wouldn't Want Your Grandmother to See” is the title of a post from a year ago highlighting how user’s confusion about how their content is shared have led to misunderstandings. It’s also good advice on how to evaluate personal content before sharing on any social network. Its final piece of advice … Continue reading Thoughts about data silos and on Microsoft buying LinkedIn

My favorite TechCrunch Disrupt startup: Bark

The TechCrunch Disrupt conference is always an interesting litmus test of the industry and this week’s event in New York did not disappoint. My favorite part of the conference is the Startup Battlefield, where sometimes whimsical, sometimes world-changing products are presented by teams from all over the world. This time, one finalist caught my attention: … Continue reading My favorite TechCrunch Disrupt startup: Bark

Why we can’t have nice things: planning for abuse

As a product manager, it's really easy to plan for good behavior. Think of a scenario, map the flow, design the product. It can be that simple. Of course, along the way assumptions are made about how the user interacts with the product. Assumptions that in some ways can be reflective of the PM’s personal … Continue reading Why we can’t have nice things: planning for abuse

Location tracking on mobile: the new battlefield?

A few weeks ago the Wall Street Journal reported on its readers’ top tech peeves for apps and gadgets in 2016 and I was not surprised to see one of my “favorites” included on this list: location tracking. It’s a valuable bit of information for advertisers so it’s not that surprising that apps like to … Continue reading Location tracking on mobile: the new battlefield?

Paying attention to the privacy trade-offs that users are willing to make

Last week Pew Research published the results of a study on how privacy and sharing personal information influence users’ adoption of different technologies such as social media, smart thermostats and retail loyalty cards. Users were asked about specific privacy and data trade-offs they would make in order to use a specific device or service. The … Continue reading Paying attention to the privacy trade-offs that users are willing to make

The wild, wild west of data collection and one user who fought back

An interesting post by Rebecca Bowe yesterday discusses a lawsuit heard last week in the Supreme Court which will determine the rights of individuals to sue corporations based on the data collected about them. Thomas Robins claimed that Spokeo collected and sold incorrect information about him, hurt his chances to get  a job and caused … Continue reading The wild, wild west of data collection and one user who fought back

Paying for restaurant reservations, a new surge pricing twist

Maybe it’s because we’re in a bubble. Maybe life is really good right now for a lot of people. Or maybe I’m underestimating the need to eat at the hot spot right now. Yet, evidently, many of Open Table’s users are willing to pay a hefty price just to be seated at popular restaurants tonight. … Continue reading Paying for restaurant reservations, a new surge pricing twist